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New steel grades for meat cutting tools

22 November 2019

Uddeholm has introduced new steel grades for cutting tools and grinding kits for use within the food industry. Benefits are said to include cleaner cuts, less friction, extended lifetime with less maintenance of the knives and parts. 

The most commonly used steel grades for the production of cutting tools in the food industry are not sufficiently durable in order to maintain a sharp edge. Cutting tools and grinding kits must remain stable within the desired tolerance to enable the increase in production and support improved capacity utilisation. Yield losses generally occur in the last part of the production process near to a scheduled stop. This is because the equipment is overloaded and pushed to the maximum, in order to avoid costly interruptions, due to down time through the replacement of tools. 

Uddeholm have steel grades that are approved for food processing and can be hardened to a high hardness. In many cases the steel grades have to show a combination of properties such as wear and corrosion resistance as well as toughness. Uddeholm Vanax Super Clean, which is a powder metallurgical produced steel grade, is said to fulfill all of these requirements.

The company tells us that a blade made of Uddeholm Vanax SuperClean will obtain a tool life that is at least three times longer than comparable blades made of standard steel W. 1.4112. In addition to a longer running blade life, the total service life of the blade is also extended due to the edge retention and durability of the material.


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