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Landia praises ADBA’s drive to raise biogas plant standards

20 December 2011

Landia has praised the drive by ADBA to encourage safe growth of the industry, which was highlighted at the Association’s national conference in Westminster during a special ‘Role of Standards’ debate

Chaired by Terry Brownhill, Director of Eaton Management, the presentations and subsequent debate highlighted the need for standards to be better known.

Landia’s Paul Davies commented: “The speakers recognised the call for more understanding of the differences between UK and European standards, which can make best practice almost impossible to achieve at times”.

He added: “ADBA has taken a very positive step forward for the industry with this debate because safety issues need to be addressed”.

During the ‘Role of Standards’ session, Terry Brownhill stressed the need to increase the number of informed professionals working in the biogas industry, so that those operating a plant automatically know what standards are required.

Fellow speakers Gwyn Jones (Vice President NFU), and Howard Leberman (Senior Advisor – Site Based, Environment Agency) echoed the fact that more hands-on training courses are required to develop the right skills and knowledge of how to run a biogas plant safely.

Terry Brownhill also pointed out that in some cases, it could cost an operator up to £200,000 to empty and re-commission a digester if it wasn’t commissioned or operated effectively. This figure takes into account downtime, treatment costs, loss of revenue and depreciation charges – all of which could come about through lack of know-how.


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