This website uses cookies primarily for visitor analytics. Certain pages will ask you to fill in contact details to receive additional information. On these pages you have the option of having the site log your details for future visits. Indicating you want the site to remember your details will place a cookie on your device. To view our full cookie policy, please click here. You can also view it at any time by going to our Contact Us page.

Lightweight bottles 'ensure new Aspall vinegars are natural choice'

09 May 2011

Demand for high quality food products in environmentally friendly packaging is said to have been addressed by Aspall in collaboration with glass-packaging manufacturer, Beatson Clark

Aspall has launched a range of high quality vinegars after six months' intensive consumer and trade research.

The 11-strong range, which includes various vinegars such as Malt, Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc and Apple Balsamic Vinegar, is packaged in bespoke lightweight white flint 250ml and 350ml bottles produced by Beatson Clark.

Charlotte Taylor, Beatson Clark’s marketing manager said: “Aspall assigned Beatson Clark with the task of developing glass bottles for its premium range of vinegars that would represent the long established brand and its heritage.

“The stylish look of the bottle, with its slim 28mm neck finish, perfectly depicts the authenticity of Aspall’s new hand-crafted vinegars while also ensuring on-shelf presence.

“Glass is a natural choice for food producers wishing to display the quality of their products; it is also a perfect choice for those consumers keen to purchase products in environmentally friendly packaging. By using a lightweighting process in the packaging design, coupled with the recyclable and natural benefits of glass, we were able to provide Aspall with bottles that fit the bill.”

During the lightweighting process Beatson Clark reduced the weight of the 250ml bottle design by 44g and the 350ml version by 115g, which resulted in more efficient transportation of the goods, ensuring significantly reduced impact on the environment. This was accomplished while retaining the quality feel that glass provides.

Aspall’s commercial director, Geoff Bradman said: “Among the key findings, from our research, were that consumers wanted more suggestions on how to use vinegar, and they'd prefer smaller bottles that could be displayed on work surfaces”.

“We had addressed this by discontinuing our 500ml bottle in favour of the new, more contemporary smaller sized bottles and the inclusion of recipe suggestions on the neck labels.

“We chose Beatson Clark for the quality of service they provide. They've proved they can always deliver on the project specifications, from design conception to execution of the high standard Aspall expect for its premium products.”


Contact Details and Archive...

Print this page | E-mail this page

RELATED CONTENT...


Article image Multimillion pound biogas plant opens in North East

A new £8million food waste plant has opened in County Durham in a bid to serve the North East’s need to recycle food waste and create renewable energy.Full Story...

FDF: a return to growth for food and drink exports

The Food and Drink Federation (FDF) today reported that in the first half of 2013, total UK food and non-alcoholic drink exports grew by more than 2 per cent to more than 6.1 billion pounds.Full Story...

UK's only beverage carton recycling plant opens for business

Celebrity food expert to speak at Food Processing Awards

British produced food would only last until August

RELATED SPONSORED ARTICLES...


Article image Automatic effluent sampling part of Patak’s push for environmental perfection

Aquamatic Ltd, leading UK manufacturer of automatic wastewater sampling equipment, have supplied an outdoor, temperature-controlled, MCERTs Certified waste water sampler system to Patak’s Foods, where it is being used to help monitor effective effluent treatment through Patak’s recently installed Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) plant.Full Story...

Article image Food for thought: What goes into building an Olympic Park?

New data shows what went into building the Olympic Park. Around 46,000 construction workers helped build the Olympic Park and Village for London 2012. That’s a lot of builders’ tums. And when a cheese and pickle sarnie just wasn’t enough, those builders needed a Boost. 7,000 of them, in fact. Every month.Full Story...

MOST VIEWED...


Article image Spray and save on the glazing process

Food glazes are widely used in the bakery sector to improve the look and taste of baked products. Traditionally, this coating process has resulted in substantial waste. Technology advances mean that this is no longer the case. Full Story...

Article image Getting the Industry 4.0 journey started

Suzanne Gill finds out why the UK food industry needs to embrace the idea of Industry 4.0 and why the journey needs to start now. Full Story...

Oil-free compressor breaks with tradition

Don’t get left out in the cold this Christmas

Your flexible friend in the food factory

http://www.appetite4eng.co.uk