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New Laidler machinery safety courses

20 January 2011

With just under a year to go until EN 954-1 is replaced by EN 13849-1 Laidler Associates, has announced it's expanding its range of machinery safety courses to cover electrical safety and the newer functional safety standards

The first of the new courses, ‘Electrical Machinery Safety Awareness’, runs for one-day and delegates will be given an awareness of the relevant regulations and how standards can be used for compliance. Delegates will gain an understanding of electrical safety legislation, regulations, standards and terminology.

Entitled ‘Practical Electrical Machinery Safety’, the second course consists of two days, incorporating the first course as the content for day one and then on day two delegates increase their knowledge base and apply this through a practical assessment. Delegates will gain the skills and knowledge required to help with the identification of unsafe electrical situations and the methods involved in assessing electrical equipment.

The final course, Electrical Machinery Safety – including Control Integrity, which runs for five days introduces attendees to the concept of safety related control circuits. The course will cover the functional safety standards EN 13849-1 and EN 62061 and demonstrate practical real-life examples of how these standards are used and validated. The course also includes an introduction to electromagnetic (EMC) compatibility and how this applies in the machinery safety field.

The five day course is currently being evaluated by Teesside University with the aim of gaining accreditation alongside the current Laidler University Certificate in European Machine Safety Requirements.

Speaking about the expansion to the range of machinery safety courses, Laidler Associates’ managing director Paul Laidler said:

“We are seeing a real trend developing in industry where the ramifications of EN 13849 and the New Machinery Directive are not being fully understood and applied. Therefore we have decided to increase both the range and the frequency of the courses that we offer so that we can reach as many people as possible before the grace period runs out in December 2011”.


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