This website uses cookies primarily for visitor analytics. Certain pages will ask you to fill in contact details to receive additional information. On these pages you have the option of having the site log your details for future visits. Indicating you want the site to remember your details will place a cookie on your device. To view our full cookie policy, please click here. You can also view it at any time by going to our Contact Us page.

Dairy 'leads way on carbon footprinting'

07 September 2010

“Guidelines for the Carbon Footprinting of Dairy Products in the UK” was developed by experts in carbon footprinting from Dairy UK, DairyCo and the Carbon Trust in collaboration with major dairy processing companies

The 'Guidelines' apply the methodology of PAS 2050 to ensure the dairy sector has a common approach and can focus on reducing emissions rather than discussing the methodology.

The guidelines will be used by dairy processing companies to help them measure carbon emissions across their supply chain. As well as ensuring a consistent approach to carbon footprinting in the industry, the guidelines are designed to help those involved at every stage of production to understand the importance of carbon footprint measurement and explain how it is done in a clear and accessible way.

“Dairy companies and their farm suppliers are committed to reducing the environmental impact of dairy products in the UK and this guidance document will help the sector measure, monitor, and manage carbon out of the supply chain” said Dairy UK Environment Manager, Fergus McReynolds.

Dr Karen Wonnacott, DairyCo Research and Development Manager, added “this work builds on the dairy industry’s commitment to reducing carbon in the supply chain and will aid farmers and the whole sector in achieving the challenging targets set out in the industry’s Milk Roadmap.”

Euan Murray, Head of Footprinting at the Carbon Trust, said: “Dairy products such as milk, cheese and yoghurt are found in the homes and shopping baskets of most UK consumers, so by working to reduce their carbon impact we can make a real difference. Building a consistent and accurate footprint is a key step towards managing and reducing carbon emissions and we are pleased to have helped Dairy UK and DairyCo develop sector specific guidance on carbon footprinting.”


Contact Details and Archive...

Print this page | E-mail this page

RELATED CONTENT...


Article image New investment for plant-based foods company Alpro

In March 2015, Alpro officially opened its newly extended production site, enabling them to double their capacity in their UK drinks facility. Food Processing took a look around the extended site.Full Story...

Article image Cheese packing factory closure will damage Wrexham economy, warns Unite

The closure of First Milk’s Maelor cheese packing site near Wrexham could damage the local economy and starve it of much needed jobs warned Britain’s largest union Unite, today.Full Story...

Dairy Crest talks apprenticeships at Appetite for Engineering

Food watchdog clamps down on milk powder manufacturers

Moody Systems to distribute Stoelting cheese making equipment

RELATED SPONSORED ARTICLES...


Article image Moody Systems to distribute Stoelting cheese making equipment

Moody Systems Ltd and RELCO, LLC are delighted to announce that they have signed a sole distribution agreement for Stoelting cheese making equipment that is designed and manufactured by RELCO, LLC of Willmar, Minnesota.Full Story...

Article image Heat recovery helps dairy farm reduce energy costs

A UK dairy farm was interested to learn if they were missing out on any potential energy and cost savings. The farm currently processes a large amount of milk which produces a considerable amount of heat. The farm also uses heated water for washing and sanitising equipment which was heated separately. ICS Temperature Control arranged a site visit to carry out an energy analysis.Full Story...

Made in Dorset to satisfy tropical taste buds

MOST VIEWED...


Article image Spray and save on the glazing process

Food glazes are widely used in the bakery sector to improve the look and taste of baked products. Traditionally, this coating process has resulted in substantial waste. Technology advances mean that this is no longer the case. Full Story...

Article image Getting the Industry 4.0 journey started

Suzanne Gill finds out why the UK food industry needs to embrace the idea of Industry 4.0 and why the journey needs to start now. Full Story...

Oil-free compressor breaks with tradition

Don’t get left out in the cold this Christmas

Your flexible friend in the food factory

http://www.appetite4eng.co.uk