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Defra committed to 'zero waste economy'

02 August 2010

Opening a call for evidence, Environment Secretary Caroline Spelman has called on businesses, households, communities, and local authorities in England to contribute their views

The review will look at what policies are needed to reduce the amount of waste generated and to maximise reuse and recycling, while also considering how waste policies affect local communities, individual households and businesses.

Caroline Spelman said:“This is an exciting opportunity to look again at how we can increase recycling, reduce landfill and help unlock the real economic value of items people no longer want.

“We are committed to working towards a zero waste economy because it makes environmental and economic sense. Reducing waste needs to be made as easy as possible for people, it should be driven by incentives not penalties and common sense rather than coercion.

“We want everyone to have their say on what waste policies should look like and how existing policies affect them. This will be a comprehensive review of all waste policy from product packaging to waste collection and I would urge everyone to get involved.”

Some of the areas the review will consider include:

· How voluntary ‘Responsibility Deals’ with businesses can play a role in waste reduction and more efficient use of resources;

· How best to encourage and incentivise individuals, businesses and communities to produce less waste and recycle more;

· How government can work with local councils to increase the frequency and quality of rubbish collections;

· Future infrastructure needs, including the role of energy from waste and anaerobic digestion; and

· How business and household waste is collected, sorted and recycled.



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