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Energy drinks market looks healthy

29 August 2016

According to Mintel Global New Products Database (GNPD), more energy drinks were launched globally in 2015 than in any year since 2008, with the number of energy drink products launched growing 29% between 2010 and 2015. 

Germany recorded the highest share of new energy drink product launches in 2015, overtaking the US for the first time, with 9% of global energy drink launches occurring in Germany in 2015, as opposed to 8% in the US. In comparison, Germany experienced just 6% of global new energy drink product launches in 2014, while 10% of global launches took place in the US.

Volume sales of energy drinks are also. In 2015, the global market for energy drinks rose by 10% to reach 8.8 billion litres. Around the world, the top five energy drinks markets in terms of volume sales are the US, China, the UK, Thailand and Vietnam. Additionally, volume sales in Germany reached 328 million litres, with Austria and Switzerland following much further behind.


Commenting on the figures, Alex Beckett, global food and drink analyst at Mintel, said:

“Energy drinks remain the controversial, yet undeniably successful, wild child of the soft drinks family. The primary driver of global growth remains the drinks’ capacity to provide consumers with a quick and effective energy boost – something which resonates with consumers the world over. Energy drinks are benefitting from being championed by giant brands, which devote huge investment to advertising and high profile marketing initiatives to project an exciting and edgy image. However, in less developed regions, local energy drink brands are emerging and gaining distribution as a more affordable alternative to multinationals, adding pressure for major players to project a brand identity that consumers from New York to Beijing want to be associated with, and pay more for.”

On a natural note, Mintel research indicates that introductions bearing an organic claim have reached a record high. Some 7% of energy drinks launched globally in 2015 carried an organic claim, up from 4% in 2011. And organic innovation shows few signs of slowing down: so far in 2016, as many as 6% of global launches have carried an organic claim, with Europe leading the way. 

The rise in organic launches comes as consumers show strong interest in more natural energy drinks, with one-in-four US consumers saying they would be more comfortable drinking energy drinks or shots made with all-natural ingredients. Over half of consumers in Poland, Spain, Italy and Germany say they would like to see a wider variety of sports and energy drinks made with natural colourings and flavours.

In China, thirst for more natural energy drinks is evident in that two in five (40%) consumers say they’d be encouraged to buy a sports of energy drink product made from natural ingredients.

“The rise in global organic energy drink offerings illustrates how the sector is attempting to appeal to a broader audience by conveying a more natural image. For the foreseeable future, brands will remain under pressure to reformulate with better-for-you ingredients,” said Beckett.


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