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Tesco ‘straighten out’ their croissants

22 February 2016

Tesco have removed curved croissants from their shelves due to falling demand. The British public, apparently, prefer their croissants straight. 

The retailer announced last week it was phasing out the crescent-shaped pastry, after opinion polls said the public preferred straight ones for their ‘spreadability factor’. 

“After demand for crescent shaped croissants started falling, we spoke to our customers and nearly 75 per cent of them told us that they preferred straight ones,” said Tesco croissant buyer Harry Jones.

“At the heart of the move away from curved croissants is the spreadability factor. The majority of shoppers find it easier to spread jam, or their preferred filling, on a straighter shape with a single sweeping motion. 

“With the crescent shaped croissants,  it’s more fiddly and most people can take up to three  attempts to achieve perfect coverage, which increases the potential for accidents involving sticky fingers and tables.”

While the croissant is the world’s most famous French pastry the bread’s origins lie in Austria and a crescent shaped roll called a Kipferl – the German word for crescent shaped - which was created to celebrate the defeat of the Turkish army at the siege of Vienna in 1683.

The Viennese bakers came up with a brioche in the shape of a crescent, an emblem which was part of the Turkish flag.

In around 1838 an Austrian artillery officer founded a Viennese bakery in Paris which sold, among other breads, the Kipferl.

They became extremely popular and quickly inspired imitations across the whole country and other parts of Europe including England – so much so that they even gained a mention in a Charles Dickens’ written periodical called All The Year Around in 1872.

Croissants are made from a leavened form of puff pastry with the yeast dough layered with butter then rolled and folded several times in succession before being rolled into a sheet.


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